Friday, February 5, 2016

Method Writing

Method Writing
by Liz Fielding 

Thanks so much for inviting me on the blog today, Darlene. It’s a real pleasure to be here.

A couple of days ago I was listening to the radio while getting breakfast. It was one of those breakfast magazine programmes – news, chat, interesting stuff - and there was someone talking about “method writing”. My ears immediately pricked up because this is what I’ve been doing all my life, maybe because my first driving ambition was to be an actress :)

Three or four years ago I gave a talk at the British Romantic Novelists’ Association conference on blending humour with emotion and I explained how I used my own life experiences to help me get that on the page.

The writer’s memory is her toolbox and somewhere within it you will find a memory of an occasion when, one moment you’ve been laughing, on top of the world celebrating some achievement with family, friends and then, without warning, there’s a prickle behind your eyelids as you remember someone who is no longer there to share it with you. That “how Mum would have loved this” moment. There – tears in my eyes right now.

Sweet memories. Lovely times with my Dad on a beach – he made the world’s best sandcastles – and rides out on his motorbike to see the bluebells. My Mum – who hated sewing – struggling with a costume for me to wear in the school play. (I had some of the audience in tears by this time!)

The moments of embarrassment that twenty years on can still make you shudder. And there is a night in my memory when, long, long ago I was alone in my apartment and someone tried to break in. I will never forget the throat closing terror of not being able to scream. I thought that one would be perfect for a radio play. One day, maybe…

Those memories are part of your writing arsenal. Use it!

You’ll find the full text of Blending Humour with Emotion on the “On Writing” page on my website http://www.lizfielding.com/onwriting.html

About Liz 
Twice winner of Romance Writers of America, prestigious RITA award and with a Lifetime Achievement Award from Romantic Times BOOKclub, best-selling author Liz Fielding has more than 15 million books in print. For news and excerpts of her latest releases, visit Liz's web site at http://www.lizfielding.com

Her Italian knight… 

Angelica Amery has come to Milan for a fresh start, only to find that the bijou apartment she'd rented doesn't exist! Taking refuge in a nearby café, she meets enigmatic but darkly handsome Dante Vettori, who comes to her rescue… 

What else could Dante do? He feels responsible for Geli, and that's before he kisses her! But soon this unconventional English girl is playing havoc with his complicated life and emotions, throwing into stark relief just how much Dante needs rescuing right back!

I have a copy of my Little Book of Writing Romance to giveaway AND my latest Harlequin Romance, Vettori’s Damsel in Distress!
Leave a comment and I’ll pick a winner.

17 comments:

  1. Great post.
    I've used a few of my personal memories for characters. It does help them to come alive.

    Tweeted.

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  2. Absolutely, Victoria. And you can use the emotion those memories evoke to add depth to your writing.

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  3. Thank you, Liz, for being our special guest today!
    I'm a huge fan of Liz's writing and already have both of the books that she's generously offering as a giveaway.
    The Little Book of Writing Romance is a must have for all romance writers!
    And I just finished reading Vettori's Damsel in Distress...a must read :)

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    1. I love being here, Darlene, and thanks for the lovely comments on both books!

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  4. Annodonnell64@gmail.comFebruary 5, 2016 at 12:25 PM

    What inspired you to start writing

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    1. I always wanted to write, Ann. I started writing children's stories when my own were little and then read an article about the two early Harlequin greats, Charlotte Lamb and Ann Hampson and I wanted to be them!

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  5. In awe of all your wonderful achievements. I enjoyed "Blending Humor with Emotion" on your website. Thank you for posting such helpful articles on writing. I'll be back for more.

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    1. Thanks for stopping by, Gini. I'm so glad you enjoyed it and found it useful.

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  6. Great post. I can relate to drawing on past experience. Yesterday, I was writing the last chapter of a novel and made myself cry as I tore two sisters apart in 1886 Montana. As a reader of history, I know in real life they probably never saw each other again.

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    1. It's a magic moment when you're sitting at the keyboard with tears pouring down your face. Those separations were heartrending. We had a lot of emigration to Australia when I was young and the nearest most people travelled was to the sea for a holiday - not far when you live in the UK. They knew that they would never see their loved ones again back in the days before cheap mass air travel.

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  7. I agree that blending humor with emotion is lovely. We all enjoy laughing and crying. Sometimes we can just be in a place, it may be new to us but it strikes cords of other events. I find setting to be a touchstone for memory.

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    1. Thank you, Annette. For me the trigger has to be scent. Baby powder, a whiff of cigar smoke, the sharp tang of fresh sweat. :)

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  8. It's great to be able to put all your thoughts on paper & bring it to life in a book. I now when I read your books I feel like I'm living inside the story & all the characters are my friends our neighbors. This giveaway would be a great Birthday present to me, for tomorrow, Monday, Feb. 8th is my birthday. Thanks for all your wonderful books & sharing them with us your readers. Linda May

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    1. That's wonderful to hear, Linda May. A huge compliment for a writer. Thank you so much.

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  9. Thank you for the advice! A dash of humour in a romance makes it all the more endearing and relatable.

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    1. I do love a man who can make you laugh and I guess men must feel the same about women. Passion, desire is great but a long happy marriage does need a sense of humour, Melinda!

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